A short movie about expedition of the UkrSA, made by Bulgarian members of the expedition

A short movie about expedition of the Ukrainian Speleological Assosiation in the deepest cave in the World Kruber-Voronya (-2197 m), made by Bulgarian members of the expedition. First ever video from diving in the bottom siphon "Two Captains". During this diving the diver Gennadiy Samokhin is triyng to catch a unique fish, which is probably living there. Unfortunately, fish was not caught. Instead of the fish, invertebrate from the genus Zenkevitchia Birstein was found. It is probably new species for the science.Video from a caves made whit Go pro Cameras!

(bg)Кратък филм създаден от българските участници в експедицията на Украинската спелео асоциация в най-дълбоката пропаст на Земята Крубер-Вороня (-2197 м). Тук са единствените за сега кадри от гмуркане в крайният сифон на пещерата. В това гмуркане водолазът Генадий Самохин опитва да улови уникална риба вероятно обитаваща това място. За съжаление риба не бе уловена а безгръбначно от Род Zenkevitchia Birstein вероятно ново за науката! Кадрите под земята са заснети благодарение на Go pro!

Krasnaya 2012: why the cave is no longer to "grow"?

4sport.ua open a special topic of the Krasnaya Cave (or, more precisely, the cave system) - Krasnaya 2012: why the cave is no longer to "grow"?

In the development of this theme Gennady Samokhin gave an interview to 4sport.ua

Interview with Gennady Samokhin

For publication 4sport.ua

From July 21st till August 27th year 2012 Ukrainian Speleological Association held expedition to Krubera-Voronya Cave, during which the deepest mark in the world of -2196 meters was reached.

Thus, once again world record was set in the Krubera-Voronya Cave.

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Call of the Abyss—World's Deepest Cave

science.nationalgeographic.com

Written by Alexander Klimchouk

Republished from the pages of National Geographic magazine

krubera-cave samokhin

The Big Cascade, the largest pit in Krubera Cave, plunges 499 feet (152 meters), but spans less than a tenth of the distance to the cave's unknown bottom. Descending into Krubera, in the country of Georgia, one team member said, "was like climbing an inverted Mount Everest."

When Sergio García-Dils de la Vega kissed his girlfriend, Pilar Orche, goodbye at the entrance to Krubera Cave, he promised to return the next day. But after teammate Bernard Tourte bruised his side in a tight passage, García-Dils decided to stay with him at an underground camp, missing his chance to return to the surface before going deeper. It was two weeks before Orche saw her boyfriend again.

Our expedition, however, had come prepared for a long siege, bringing more than five tons of gear to the cave. Ever since 1956, when explorers in France first descended below 1,000 meters (3,281 feet), generations of cavers had dreamed of achieving the 2,000-meter (6,562-foot) mark. Would Krubera take us there?

Cutting a jagged path through the limestone of the Arabika massif on the edge of the Black Sea, the “trail” to Krubera Cave drops down a chain of pitches, cascades, and pits—some more than 100 meters (328 feet) deep—connected by narrow rift passages called meanders. The cave, located in the separatist region of Abkhazia, was named after Russian geologist Alexander Kruber. In 1960 researchers from the Republic of Georgia explored it to a depth of 90 meters (295 feet). Two decades later, I organized a series of expeditions to investigate new deep caves, using dye traces in cave streams to probe Arabika’s potential depth. In 2001 a team led by Ukrainian Yuri Kasjan set a world record in the cave of 1,710 meters (5,610 feet). Last July a Moscow-based team extended that to 1,775 meters. Our hope was to find a path past 2,000 meters (6,562 feet).

At the start of the expedition, Alexander Karpechenko, whose nickname is “Brick,” exulted in getting his hands on a brand new gasoline-powered hammer that he planned to use to bore holes for explosives to free up tight passages. Team members in nearby Snow Cave cleared blasted rubble from a passage that had been blocked by a “boulder choke.”

Like mountaineers scaling a Himalaya peak, our expedition of 56 cavers from seven countries established a series of campsites at depths of 700, 1,215, 1,410, and 1,640 meters (2,300, 3,990, 4,600, and 5,380 feet). There team members cooked meals, slept five and six to a tent, huddled for warmth, and worked for up to 20 hours at a stretch.

By the third week our downward progress was blocked by a sump at a depth of 1,775 meters

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Call of the Abbys

header ngm mag

ngm.nationalgeographic.com

Deepest Cave. MAY 2005

ft hdr.4

By Alexander Klimchouk

Photographs by Stephen L. Alvarez

First an intrepid team of explorers broke the depth record in Krubera—the world's deepest cave—near the Black Sea coast. Then a second team went deeper.

Get a taste of what awaits you in print from this compelling excerpt.

When Sergio García-Dils de la Vega kissed his girlfriend, Pilar Orche, goodbye at the entrance to Krubera Cave, he promised to return the next day. But after teammate Bernard Tourte bruised his side in a tight passage, García-Dils decided to stay with him at an underground camp, missing his chance to return to the surface before going deeper. It was two weeks before Pilar Orche saw her boyfriend again.

Our expedition, however, had come prepared for a long siege, bringing more than five tons of gear to the cave. Ever since 1956, when explorers in France first descended below 1,000 meters (3,281 feet), generations of cavers had dreamed of achieving the 2,000-meter (6,600-foot) mark. Would Krubera take us there?

Cutting a jagged path through the limestone of the Arabika massif on the edge of the Black Sea, the "trail" into Krubera Cave drops down a chain of pitches, cascades, and pits—some more than 100 meters (300 feet) deep—connected by narrow rift passages called meanders. The cave, located in the separatist region of Abkhazia, was named after Russian geologist Alexander Kruber. In 1960 researchers from the Republic of Georgia explored it to a depth of 90 meters (295 feet). Two decades later, I organized a series of expeditions to investigate new deep caves, using dye traces in cave streams to probe Arabika's potential depth. In 2001 a team led by Ukrainian Yuri Kasjan set a world record in the cave of 1,710 meters (5,610 feet). Last July a Moscow-based team extended that to 1,775 meters (5,823 feet). Our hope was to find a path past 2,000 meters (6,600 feet).

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